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Sacred cave where giant lions were sacrificed 60,000 years ago discovered in Russia

•Haul of ancient bones was found inside Imanai cave in the Ural Mountains

•The 500 bones and fragments are said to have belonged to giant cave lions

•Animals were around 25% larger than today’s lions and hunted cave bears

•Experts believe the lions in the cave were sacrifices made to ancient gods 

A huge collection of animal bones - dating back up to 60,000 years - has been unearthed deep within the Ural Mountains of Russia. 

More than 500 bones and fragments were discovered inside the Imanai cave, in the republic of Bashkiria, and experts believe they belonged to giant cave lions.

Read more: Sacred cave where giant lions were sacrificed 60,000 years ago discovered in Russia

3,000-year-old leather-working Bronze knife discovered on beach

•Couple used a metal detector to hunt for metal objects on Sandown Beach

•They found the knife or leather working tool beneath a stone slab

•Experts confirmed the tool is 3,000-years-old and made of copper alloy

•Find is now on display at Newport Roman Villa on the Isle of Wight

A 3,000-year-old Bronze Age knife has been discovered on a popular beach by two curious holidaymakers.

Christopher and June Preece came across the ancient artefact hidden beneath a stone slab while visiting Sandown Beach on the Isle of Wight.

Experts believe it would probably have been used as a leather working tool, rather than as a weapon.

While most people would be content sunbathing or collecting shells, the couple from Banbury, Oxfordshire, used a metal detector to hunt for historical objects and were surprised to find such an old tool.

They took it to the Isle of Wight Council’s finds liaison officer, Frank Basford, who confirmed the knife was made in 1,000BC.

Read more: 3,000-year-old leather-working Bronze knife discovered on beach

Trail of destruction: The world heritage tourist sites wiped off ISIS

Nada al-Hassan of Unesco’s World Heritage Centre revealed to MailOnline Travel how ISIS’ impact is rippling through the historical world.

She said: ‘Syria and Iraq are really places where we have the origins of civilisation where the alphabet, agriculture and urbanism were invented and they are extremely important for all of humanity. 

‘For Unesco it’s important that the international community protects sites as it’s our shared responsibility.’

Here is a round-up of the tourism and historical highlights devastated by ISIS so far, as reported by CNN.  

Palmyra, Syria

Described by Unesco as ‘an oasis in the Syrian desert’ Palmyra, north-east of Damascus, is home to the ruins of a city that was once considered one of the most important cultural hubs in the ancient world.

From the first to second century, Palmyra was uniquely influenced by several civilisations and Graeco-Roman and Persian touches are evident in its art and architecture. 

‘Palmyra is an important tourism site and it’s extremely important in terms of art and architecture in the region.

‘It’s under ISIS control. it hasn’t been destroyed but more than 50 funeral busts have been looted. These dates back to Roman era of second and third century. 

‘The sculptural art is not really typical in this site and is not [found] anywhere else,’ explained al-Hassan. 

Before ISIS took full control of the city in May 2015, the director of antiquities in Damascus transferred Palmyra’s museum collections which included hundreds of statues and artefacts to Damascus.

But the tombs that could not be removed have since been damaged. And the ancient Roman ampitheatre is reportedly being used by militants for mass killings.

Bosra, Syria

Read more: Trail of destruction: The world heritage tourist sites wiped off ISIS

Pictograms found in ancient Turkish city could be 12,000-years-old

•Archaeologists unearthed a carving in ancient Turkish city of Göbekli Tepe

•They say pictograph may be depicting the practice of Neolithic sky burials

•It shows a human head on the wing of a vulture and a body beneath it

•They are thousands of years older than other forms of written language.

A series of carvings found on a pillar of limestone in the mountains of southern Turkey could be the world’s oldest written language.

The ancient pictograms, which were found at the ancient city of Göbekli Tepe in southeast Anatolia, Turkey, are thought to be around 12,000 years old.

The scene shows a human head on the wing of a vulture and a headless human body below.

Read more: Pictograms found in ancient Turkish city could be 12,000-years-old

Discovered: Letter from Eminem to Tupac’s mother

The rapper cites Tupac Shakur as an inspiration in handwritten letter.

A letter from the 155 million selling hip-hop star to the mother of late rapper Tupac Shakur has been rediscovered by Reddit users.

Eminem, born Marshall Mathers, has always cited Shakur as a musical influence. In this undated letter, which accompanied a drawing of the Changes singer, Mathers also credits Shakur as a personal inspiration

“When I was feeling at my worst (before fame, before [Dr] Dre) I knew I could put that Tupac tape in, and suddenly, things weren’t so bad,” the Stan rapper said in his letter.

Beginning by apologising for drawing in pen rather than pencil, the Slim Shady star went on to call Shakur’s mother Afeni “a true Queen, [...] in every sense of the word. I will never forget the opportunities you have given me. You will always be in my heart, my thoughts and my prayers.”

Read more: Discovered: Letter from Eminem to Tupac’s mother

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